Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 28th International Conference on Family Nursing and Healthcare San Antonio,Texas, USA.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Valerie Dzubur

Samuel Merritt University, USA

Keynote: The family has cancer
Family Nursing 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Valerie Dzubur  photo
Biography:

Valerie Dzubur is an Associate Professor in the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) program at Samuel Merritt University (SMU), Oakland, California. She has developed the Family Nursing course for both the online and face to face students at SMU in the FNP program in 2015. She holds a degree as Doctor of Education (EdD) from the University of San Francisco in Organization Leadership. She is interested in the relationship between human fragility and our corresponding responsibility to each other.

Abstract:

There are more than six million cancer survivors over the age of 65 in the United States. And there are many reasons why more and more people are becoming long-term cancer survivors including; new screening guidelines, access to genetic testing, early detection, advanced diagnostic tools and most importantly new innovative treatments. According to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report, people diagnosed with cancer have an estimated 64% chance of surviving more than five years. One significant exception is ovarian cancer because an early diagnosis is still difficult. Healthcare providers often overlook the early warning signs. There 22,200 new cases of ovarian cancer each year in the United States and of those 14,240 will die often as a result of a late diagnosis. It is also important to understand that a diagnosis of ovarian cancer affects the whole family because 20-25% of these cancers are related to inheritable genetics that effect both men and women. In-addition, the family experience of a cancer diagnosis goes well beyond the genetic implications of risks to other members, including both care and the potential for the loss of a loved one. Even as science transforms a cancer diagnosis into a chronic disease the family must learn new ways to live within this realty. This presentation will focus on the family experience of ovarian cancer from diagnosis to chronic disease and loss. A particular emphasis on the importance educating healthcare providers to be able to make an early diagnosis is emphasized along with the family experience.

 

Family Nursing 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Constance Ann Thomas photo
Biography:

The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand how students in a clinical education setting experienced encounters with incivility and to gain insights on what events or behaviors students identified as uncivil as well as their emotional and behavioral responses to those events. Responses to incivility were viewed through the theoretical prisms of cognitive appraisal and motivational attribution. The primary research question was: How do nursing students in a clinical education setting describe their experience with incivility? The basic qualitative method of open ended conversational interviews was aligned with the primary and secondary research questions and reflected the empirical literature reviewed. The data was analyzed for recurring patterns and new themes using a constant comparative method for each interview. The findings supported those from empirical findings from previous research in which incivility was found to be prevalent in nursing milieus and it was present during the clinical education of nursing students in this study. The 12 participants in this study felt unprepared to effectively respond when encountering incivility and experienced emotional and behavioral harm from the encounters. The research demonstrated a gap in preparing students and making them aware that incivility may occur in nursing. There is a need to provide information early in the nursing curriculum about incivility and methods for responding to it. Nurse educators have a responsibility to provide knowledge about incivility and effective communication methods. This is needed when socializing those becoming novice nurses.

Abstract:

Constance Ann Thomas has completed her PhD in 2015 from Capella University, Minneapolis, MN. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor at Indiana State University, School of Nursing in Terre Haute, Indiana. Has been teaching nursing since 2004 and has presented research internationally, regionally and locally.

  • Midwifery and Women Health Nursing, Healthcare
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Lancaster began her journey in nursing 35 years ago where she has had the opportunity to work in various milieus. She is a graduate of Frontier Nursing University for both her master’s in women’s health nurse practitioner as well as her doctorate in nursing practice.  Dr. Lancaster is an assistant professor at Middle Tennessee State University where she teaches in both the undergraduate and online graduate nurse practitioner courses where she is the author/ developer for the women’s health course. She is involved in foreign medical missions, and is NAMS certified menopause practitioner where she passionately assists women during this often tumultuous time.

Abstract:

Background: Although a natural and normal transition from the childbearing years, menopause is a multifaceted event that affects women physically, mentally, and emotionally. Evidence has shown that a woman’s ability to cope with the changes and stresses of menopause can be enhanced through education. Women will spend a third of their life in a post- menopausal state. A successful transition in the individualized yet unique journey of menopause is a women’s health management challenge that can be lessened when education about menopause is provided to women by health care professionals possessing creativity, commitment, caring and skill.  The positive effects of menopause education have been reported in the literature; however, the United States has a scarcity of research that looks at educational strategies to assist women in increasing their knowledge about menopause.  The purpose of this research was to create a menopause workshop in the Upper Cumberland Region of Tennessee, where educating women could result in increasing knowledge, decreasing fear and anxiety, decreasing cost of unnecessary medications and treatment, decreasing health related issues, and promoting overall health, well-being and empowerment.

Gwenn Scott

University of Texas Medical Branch, USA

Title: Health literacy
Speaker
Biography:

Gwenn Scott has completed her Diploma in Nursing in 1976, BSN from the University of Incarnate Word San Antonio in 1987, MSN in 1990 from the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, Post-graduate as a Family Nurse Practitioner in 1998 from the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, Doctoral studies in 2013 from the University of Alabama. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Family Nurse Practitioner program at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, USA. 

Abstract:

Health literacy is the degree to which individuals has the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions and follow instructions to treatment. Most health information is written at the 10th grade level or higher. The average person in the U.S. reads at an 8th grade level. Reading at or below the 5th grade level in the U.S. are 20% of adults, 40% of older adults, 50% African-Americans and Hispanics.

Speaker
Biography:

Judy Kaye Smith has completed her PhD in 2013 from Texas Woman’s University Houston, Texas. She is an Associate Professor at Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas teaching at the graduate level. In 2014 she assumed the role of Graduate Evidence-Based Projects Manager. She has been actively involved in writing and executing several nursing grants, developed several simulation modules and has been both a podium and a poster presentation presenter at several local, regional, state and national conventions.

Abstract:

Postpartum depression (PPD) is a real complication in the postpartum period. This qualitative phenomenological study was designed to gain a broader perspective regarding the phenomenon of postpartum depression (PPD) and its impact on family structure based on face-to-face audio taped interviews. Seven male participants were recruited through a community hospital. The verbatim transcripts were rigorously analyzed and compared to identify common themes within and between the fathers’ individual experiences using a two group analysis and Spiegelberg’s (1965, 1975) six step process. The men experienced overarching feelings of being vulnerable when their partners’ behavior began to change in such a way that they no longer recognized the person she had become. They initially rationalized the cause for the changes. As things changed within their family’s structure, fathers felt an overwhelming need to try to fix things. The second major theme was one of being helpless to know what to do or say; whatever they did was not right or good enough. Given time, the third overall theme of coping emerged in which they were able to identify methods for dealing with the changes that occurred in their lives when their partner was diagnosed with postpartum depression. Suggestions included the need for more one to one education with parents. Also fathers need to be patient and more attuned to the needs of their partner. The foremost clinical implication from the study is the need for healthcare providers to develop better educational methods to relate information about postpartum depression to childbearing couples.

Speaker
Biography:

Ann W Lambert has completed her Master’s degree in Maternal Child Nursing and is full time Faculty at Auburn University School of Nursing with classroom and clinical responsibilities for Pediatric Nursing. She also maintains her practice as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner in primary care. She has over 30 years of experience in nursing and teaching nursing students. She is involved in outreach projects related to childhood obesity prevention, safe sleep and promoting breastfeeding and empathy for pregnant women.

Abstract:

We are excited to share our Outreach Project: Tiger Babies™ with our Auburn family. An interdisciplinary team from AU School of Nursing, the College of Education and the School of Industrial and Graphic Design has collaborated to offer Tiger Babies™. The goal is to support mothers who are breastfeeding during family-friendly Auburn events. Mothers and their young infants can come to a clean and private environment to breastfeed, change diapers and receive educational materials. Currently, there are no known designated areas in the stadium or surroundings areas for nursing mothers. According to our random survey of mothers with small babies, conducted during Auburn vs. South Carolina game (2014), half of them had experiences in nursing their babies in the ladies room during football games or tailgates. They also tried to find a quiet and private area, away from the crowd, to nurse their babies. The majority of women indicated they would love to have a place dedicated to nursing their babies and it would increase their willingness to bring their babies to participate in university events. Some of the locations they indicated as potential areas included inside the Stadium, the Campus Green, in front of Miller Hall, or the Wallace Center. The first area offered will be located outside of the stadium on Miller Hall lawn by the School of Nursing. It will consist of a free standing tent with sides to provide privacy to nursing mothers. This area will include a comfortable rocker, side table, an electrical outlet for breast pumps if needed, and a privacy screen. Moms will also have access to baby necessities such as diapers, wipes, disposable burp cloths and bottled water. Other provisions include a fan and heater, whichever is appropriate, for a comfortable setting. The tent will be supervised by nursing faculty and/or Lactation Consultants from East Alabama Medical Center and/or Baptist Medical Center East and will include current nursing students who are enrolled in the Childbearing and Reproductive Health Course. Educational information for new mothers will also be provided. The project could potentially reach many nursing mothers who come to our campus. Future plans are to include and area inside of the stadium, within existing First Aid Stations. We learned that if mothers requested, they have been allowed in the first aid station for nursing, but there was a lack of privacy. We currently have student nurses assigned to the First Aid Stations within the stadium; therefore, they will have the opportunity to provide support to mothers if needed. Furnishings have been approved by the Department of Design and Construction in the facilities division. Plans are to collect information from attendees to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of offering this outreach service to support breastfeeding mothers, as they enjoy Auburn events, while meeting their infants’ needs.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The use of medical cannabis in chronic illness is increasingly investigated, yet little is known about its use in paediatric populations. As child protection clinicians are often asked to provide advice around whether parents’ actions to give medical cannabis to their chronically ill child constitutes harm or risk of harm, a review of the evidence base is required. This systematic review explores the use of cannabis-derived products in children with seizure disorders. While a reduction in seizure activity was observed in some children, included studies were poorly designed and too small to extrapolate reliable conclusions about clinical use. Due to the lack of high-quality evidence, the use of cannabis-derived products is currently not recommended in children with seizure disorders. However, in assessing risk and harm to subject children by child protection physicians in Australia with existing State and Territory legislation, evaluation must occur on a case-to-case basis with each instance considered on its individual merits. Clinical trials addressing drug efficacy and long-term safety of cannabis-derived products are required.

Speaker
Biography:

Anna Chiesa Graduated in Nursing at the University of São Paulo (1981), degree in Public Health from the University of São Paulo (1982), Masters (1994) and Doctorate (1999) in Public Health at the University of São Paulo and Collective Health by USP (2005). Associate Professor of the Department of Nursing in Collective Health of EESUP. Post Doctor internship at Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, Kings College London (2011). Academic and Professional experience in Nursing, with emphasis on Health Promotion, Child Development, Family Health, Child Health and Health Education. Technical Consultant of Fundação Maria Cecília Souto Vidigal. Leader of the research group Tecnoassistential Models and Health Promotion. Member at the Scientific Committee of the Nucleus Science for Childhood. Scholarship Producer in Technological Development and Innovative Extension since 2010.

Abstract:

Through a RCT , the project tests for the first time in Latin America a novel, intensive nurse home visitation program for first-time pregnant youth living in poor urban areas between 8 and 16 weeks pregnancy until the baby is 12 months old. The program is inspired by two well-studied interventions (Nurse Family Partnership and Minding the Baby) but was tailored to the socio-cultural aspects and to the health system organization of a developing country. The project further innovates by focusing on the biological underpinnings of the positive environmental stimuli promoted by the intervention by measuring repeatedly neurophysiological indicators of brain maturation, which has not been done previously in the field. The program is supported by self-efficacy theory (Bandura), bioecological theory (Brofenbrenner) and attachment theory (Bowlby and Ainsworth). The intervention is based on: (1) Health and social care: Psychoeducation regarding maternal and child health. Also, the nurse encourages the participant to seek for health care and social services when it is needed. (2) Environmental health: The nurse provides support to identify resources to guarantee adequate living conditions, safe housing, day care and school, access to health services. (3) Life course: Life course planning to help participants achieve goals such as finish high school, find a part-time job and postpone the birth of a second child. The needs and goals of the participants are discussed individually and it is always respected. (4) Parenting skills: Intervention on parenting skills and behaviors. At the conference we intend to share the structure and instruments developed for the interventions as well as preliminary data of impact that are being collected till date.

Speaker
Biography:

Andrea Brooks has completed her PhD from Texas Woman’s University and has specialty certifications as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, along with a secondary certification in Nursing Education. She has been involved in pediatrics since 2001 and is currently a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner for both a pediatric underserved primary care and urgent care clinic. She is also a Professor of Nursing at Lone Star Community College, USA. Her future research trajectory includes developing parenting programs, assisting vulnerable populations and encouraging others in lifelong learning with aspirations for being catalysts of change.

Abstract:

This presentation describes a phenomenological study, utilizing Husserl’s (1962) phenomenological approach, which explored the lived experiences of women parenting during Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). Semi-structured open-ended interview questions with prompts were used during face-to-face individual interviews of 20 mothers to understand how each mother parented both within and outside the home. Interviews were digitally recorded and analyzed carefully using Colaizzi’s (1978) method of analysis with the finding of an overarching theme of avoiding judgment. Data from this study may assist in increasing the awareness and further understanding of experiences and feelings of mothers, who parent during intimate partner violence. Recommendations for further research include possible intervention development to support the parenting relationship between a mother and her children to preserve the health and wellbeing of both.

Speaker
Biography:

Sara Pinto has completed her master’s degree in Clinical Neuropsychology at the University Institute of Maia, Portugal. Her academic and research interests include praxis functioning, rehabilitation of human movement, executive functioning. In 2016 she published the paper “Gestural praxis in young adults with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities” at the Journal of Intelectual Disability Research, searching for an association between this function and the frontal lobe functioning. She is a Psychomotor Therapist at a non-profit organisation (NGO) that deals with individuals with disabilities. In addition, she also works with preschool children, with normal or pathological development, and at a nursing home. 

Abstract:

Praxis functioning has been poorly studied in the population with intellectual disabilities (ID). The goal of the present research was to look for a starting point to study the praxic funtioning in young adults with mild to moderate ID. Thirty participants, between the ages of 18 and 35 years, completed tests that assessed gestural praxis. It was possible to observe similar praxis behaviour in the group with ID in almost domains studied (i. e. performance under verbal command and by imitation; execution of pantomimes – simulation of the tool use - and transitive gestures – real use of the object), albeit showing statistical values lower than those of the group without ID. The sample of participants with ID does not seem to show an apraxic behaviour because they were able to reach the goal of praxic tasks performed, despite the high number of space and time errors commited. These erros may be associated with a deficit in the development of various brain functions and not only with praxis functioning, mainly relate to a lower yield in terms of planning, monitoring and correcting intentional movement. Learning a new gesture can provide support to improve communication in individuals with ID. Our results indicate that we should consider a possible change in the direct path or direct path of imitation, often used in the process of teaching and learning in individuals with ID. 

  • Geriatric Nursing, Nursing Practice

Session Introduction

Cheryl Juneau

University of Texas Medical Branch, USA

Title: Community-acquired Clostridium difficile
Speaker
Biography:

Cheryl Juneau is an Associate Professor and Track Administrator for the Family Nurse Practitioner program at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, Texas. She is certified as a Family Nurse Practitioner with over 20 years of clinical experience and 15 years of teaching experience.

Abstract:

The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile is changing. Typically associated as a nosocomial infection, it is now seen within the community in patients with few or no risk factors. This change has been attributed to a more virulent strain known as the North American Pulsed Field type 1, which is correlated with higher morbidity and mortality. This presentation will review the research findings depicting an increase incidence in community-acquired Clostridium difficile, its’ changing epidemiology and clinical implications.

Theodore Albert Metzler

Kramer School of Nursing, USA

Title: Could robotic nurses really care?
Speaker
Biography:

Theodore Albert Metzler holds BA degree in Mathematics, an MS in Computer Science and MA and PhD degree in Philosophy. Although most of his work experience in computer application software development has involved artificial intelligence, he responded to a personal calling in recent years, earning an additional MA in Theology and a Certificate in Science and Religion. At Oklahoma City University, he has served as the Director of the Darrell W. Hughes Program for Religion and Science Dialogue, Executive Director of the Oklahoma Interfaith Power and Light program and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Kramer School of Nursing, USA. 

Abstract:

The science and technologies of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics currently are presenting life-like machines that are claimed to furnish companionship in the nursing care of older people. However, critics of the claim have objected that such robots are inauthentic companions, substituting mere mimicry of human behavior for the real presence of conscious caring provided by human nurses. Viewing the robots as deceptive in this fashion has prompted additional complaints concerning psychological, moral and spiritual implications for people who interact with the machines. On the other hand, various cultural factors tend to support either setting aside or denying these criticisms. In today’s presentation we shall argue that there are some strong philosophical and scientific reasons for supporting the critics, although future development of a particular AI architecture might introduce an intriguing possibility of robotic nurses that really could care for their patients. In either case, the growing prospect of robotic nurses clearly merits attention in the geriatric healthcare community.

Speaker
Biography:

Flora Koliouli is a Psychologist, received her PhD from the University Toulouse II-Jean Jaures, France. She is a temporary Lecturer and Research Assistant in the Developmental Psychology, Department of the University of Toulouse II-Jean Jaures/ESPE. She has published 4 papers and is participating in the first national interdisciplinary project on infants and toddlers growing up in different contexts (BECO).

Abstract:

New terms emerge in recent research such as the kangaroo father care, in order to demonstrate the necessity of paternal presence in a neonatal intensive care unit. In particular, skin-to-skin contact facilitates fathers in their attainment of paternal role and implicates them more in developing skills in the caregiving process but also improves their parental sense of competence. The aim of this study is to explore the construction of the first bond by means of the skin-to-skin contact between father and infant, their sense of paternal competence as well as the stress levels during the hospitalization in a NICU. Forty-eight (48) French fathers of premature infants were interviewed, taken place in the University Hospital of Toulouse. Mixed methods were used; a semi-structured interview and two questionnaires: PSS-NICU and PSOC. Main findings show that the construction of the first bond is due to skin-to-skin contact. On one hand, it may provoke more stress to fathers but, on the other hand, it is going to involve them more as a caregiver and reinforce the paternal sense of competence. Fathers experience mixed emotions with a prevalence of the stressful aspect of prematurity. The principal sources are sights and sounds and role alteration. Fathers included in our sample have a lower level of parental competence than fathers of the general population. In conclusion, fathers play a crucial role in the caregiving process. Also, future practice is proposed.