Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 28th International Conference on Family Nursing and Healthcare San Antonio,Texas, USA.

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Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Patricia M Davidson

Johns Hopkins University, USA

Keynote: Health care: a life course approach to health and well-being

Time : 10:00-10:30

Family Nursing 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Patricia M Davidson photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Health care knowledge and practice models are commonly compartmentalized and siloed leading to poor integration and adverse health outcomes across health and social services. Healthy People 2020 in the United States and the World Health Organization’s, Closing the gap in a generation: Health equity through action on the social determinants of health (2008) provide roadmaps for addressing the social determinants of health as well as biological issues.  In this presentation the importance of social determinants of health will be addressed  and demonstration of how the environments into which people are born determine health and well –being across the lifespan, even at the moment of death.   This is an important call to action for nurses and midwives and requires considering the intersection of health and social services from maternity to end-of-life care. Implications for policy, practice, education and research will be presented.

Keynote Forum

Cindy Sickora

UT Health San Antonio, USA

Keynote: The transformational role of nursing in healthcare reform
Family Nursing 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Cindy Sickora photo
Biography:

Cindy Sickora is currently working as the Vice Dean of Practice & Engagement at the UT Health School of Nursing. Formerly with Rutgers School of Nursing, she was the CEO of the State’s only Nurse managed FQHC. She has spent her entire career working with vulnerable and underserved populations. Her areas of interest include health disparities, community engagement and population health.

Abstract:

Transforming healthcare in the US will require more than just addressing insurance related issues. Health disparities, access to care and an aging population all contribute to healthcare cost and the poor outcomes experienced by Americans. The US healthcare system remains the most expensive in the world, yet health indices continue to lag behind almost every industrialized nation. In 2010, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) called upon nursing to increase access, reduce cost and improve health outcomes. The IOM Future of Nursing (2010) report identified the nursing profession as having a critical role in transforming healthcare delivery. The report indicates that nursing is well poised to address system deficits with professional nurses practicing at the top of their licensure. That report referred to nursing exemplars and pointed out the critical role of advanced practice nursing in addressing the looming shortage of primary care providers and the importance of registered nurses practicing to the top of licensure in order to meet the complex healthcare needs of the chronically ill and vulnerable populations. Quality, cost and access have become critical indicators for third party payers. Value Based Care and Accountable Care Organization models are coming to the forefront of healthcare reimbursement. With a sound understanding of case management and care coordination, nursing practices that provide primary care, case management and care coordination are uniquely positioned to respond to complex needs of populations. Unlike other providers, nursing has been providing coordinated care for more than a century demonstrating cost effective and quality healthcare.

  • Nursing Education & Research

Session Introduction

Constance Ann Thomas

Indiana State University, USA

Title: Nursing students identify clinical incivility as harm, threat or challenge

Time : 11:20-11:40

Speaker
Biography:

Constance Ann Thomas has completed her PhD in 2015 from Capella University, Minneapolis, MN. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor at Indiana State University, School of Nursing in Terre Haute, Indiana. Has been teaching nursing since 2004 and has presented research internationally, regionally and locally.

Abstract:

The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand how students in a clinical education setting experienced encounters with incivility and to gain insights on what events or behaviors students identified as uncivil as well as their emotional and behavioral responses to those events. Responses to incivility were viewed through the theoretical prisms of cognitive appraisal and motivational attribution. The primary research question was: How do nursing students in a clinical education setting describe their experience with incivility? The basic qualitative method of open ended conversational interviews was aligned with the primary and secondary research questions and reflected the empirical literature reviewed. The data was analyzed for recurring patterns and new themes using a constant comparative method for each interview. The findings supported those from empirical findings from previous research in which incivility was found to be prevalent in nursing milieus and it was present during the clinical education of nursing students in this study. The 12 participants in this study felt unprepared to effectively respond when encountering incivility and experienced emotional and behavioral harm from the encounters. The research demonstrated a gap in preparing students and making them aware that incivility may occur in nursing. There is a need to provide information early in the nursing curriculum about incivility and methods for responding to it. Nurse educators have a responsibility to provide knowledge about incivility and effective communication methods. This is needed when socializing those becoming novice nurses.

 

Kathryn M Cacic

Roberts Wesleyan College, USA

Title: Benzodiazepines in older persons promote adverse events

Time : 11:40-12:00

Speaker
Biography:

Kathryn M Cacic has completed her DNP with a focus on executive leadership from Rush University in Chicago, Illinois. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Nursing in both the graduate and RN-BS programs. She has a long and varied career primarily in University Teaching Hospitals and spent 31 years with the USAF Reserve. Her Doctoral work focused on the reduction of benzodiazepines in older adults with poster presentations at National NICHE & GAPNA conferences. In addition to teaching, she volunteers her time as a Nurse Practitioner with a local community of Amish and serves on the Board for this Clinic.

Abstract:

A multiple of studies on the use of benzodiazepines in older persons have recently gained attention with changing population demographics. This drug category puts the older person at risk for memory impairment, hypersomnolence, falls, fractures, motor vehicle accidents and potential addiction. This problem is further compounded by the fact that over half of these populations have at least three chronic health problems for which they consume other medications. Together this leads to significant polypharmacy and inappropriate medications. This contributes to a paucity of adverse drug events. The program will discuss use of Beers criteria to reduce inappropriate medications both in the community and acute setting. Dangers of long term use of benzodiazepines results in overall poorer health and the potential harm to quality of life. Nursing must be an active partner in commitment to a multidisciplinary approach for prescribing in older persons. Advocacy for active involvement of the patient and caregivers into the prescribing decisions must be guided by good clinical practice. Non-pharmacological strategies should be encouraged such as sleep hygiene, cognitive behavioral therapy and exercise. Current quality measures focus on extensive drug reviews with reduction strategies to eliminate inappropriate medications. Use of the Beers or STOPP criteria by nursing can make a difference that is patient centered, holistic and involves families will benefit the quality of life for this population. Nursing advocacy for no benzodiazepines contributes to promoting wellness for this population.

Sherry L Donaworth

University of Cincinnati, USA

Title: Title: Cardiovascular pharmacotherapy: A focus on heart failure

Time : 12:00-12:20

Speaker
Biography:

Sherry L Donaworth is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing at the University of Cincinnati, College of Nursing, USA. She is board certified as both an Adult-Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and a Family Nurse Practitioner. Her extensive clinical practice experience has included critical care, cardiology, geriatrics as well as primary care. She has served as a Content Expert on an ANE HRSA grant for interactive case studies for distance learning students.

Abstract:

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Even as mortality rates have declined globally in recent years, one-third or more of all deaths in adults over the age of 35 is attributable to CHD. According to the American Heart Association (AHA) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), cardiovascular diseases claim more lives than all forms of cancer combined. Hypertension is a leading risk of heart disease and heart failure and the most common reason for office visits of adults to healthcare providers in the U.S. Aging of the population and improved treatment for CHD has led to an increasing prevalence of heart failure. Prescriptions to treat for cardiovascular disease are among the most commonly prescribed medications for chronic illness. Therefore, it is essential that nurses stay up-to-date regarding these frequently prescribed drug classes. This presentation will review the pathophysiology of heart disease and heart failure, as well as evidence-based treatment modalities. Indications, contraindications and adverse drug effects as well as patient education and monitoring considerations will be discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Samantha Pehl has been working as a Nurse since 30 years. She began her practice as an ADN Graduate of Cochise College in Douglas Arizona. She has Bachelors in Liberal Studies Biology, Master in Midwifery, a Postgraduate degree in Family Practice Nursing and finally a Doctorate of Nursing Practice from Frontier Nursing University in 2012. She is an Assistant Professor at Tarleton State University for 16 years, a part-time Nurse Scientist with Texas Health Resources Stephenville for 2 years and a PRN Family Nurse Practitioner with Stephenville Medical-Surgical Clinic for 9 years.

Abstract:

According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) (2012) the entry level enrollment for Baccalaureate nursing programs has risen 82.7% since 2002. The increased enrollment has translated into a need for clinical sites and experiences required to develop skilled, knowledgeable nurses. Nursing schools are looking at advances in technology to help maintain a high standard of education and provide needed clinical opportunities. Current research suggests that the use of high-fidelity simulation is an effective method of preparing nursing students to care for patients. Students can develop teaching, technical and critical thinking skills during the high-fidelity simulations that can be readily transferred to living patients in a standard care situation. This capstone project investigated the premise that simulation experiences are comparable in effectiveness to hospital clinical by comparing pretest/posttest scores and semester exams scores after a four week clinical rotation. Statistical results showed no difference in scores between the test and control groups, thus supporting the literature review and the null hypothesis.

Speaker
Biography:

Diane Ames is an associate professor in the Family Nurse Practitioner and Adult Gerontology Primary Care tracks at Concordia University. She is also a Co-Director of Graduate Nursing Programs at Concordia University. Her practice hours are at a large mid-western health care system in urgent care. Additionally, she coordinates two interprofesssional primary care projects including Diabetes and Hypertension in an underserved clinic.  

Abstract:

This interprofesssional project was piloted in a mid-western primary care clinic with an underserved African American population. Four conversation maps and facilitators guides were developed and implemented with learners from nursing, medicine, pharmacy, athletic training, nutrition, and art with oversite from faculty and volunteers. The curriculum topics included overview of hypertension, nutrition, medication, and lifestyle interventions including stress, tobacco, and exercise. This project was divided into two phases; the first phase included content on team building, health literacy, racism in medicine, roles, education, and scope of practice for the team members along with patient recruitment. The second phase included implementation of the program which included four educational sessions and one focus group. Thus far, two small cohorts have completed this educational program. The post intervention surveys demonstrated an improvement in quality of life and self-efficacy scores while the biometric data revealed mixed results. 

Speaker
Biography:

Kim White is a licensed advanced practice nurse and Clinical Associate Professor at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. She has been the Executive Director of the SIUE WE CARE Clinic for the past four years. She and her team have been responsible for the restructuring of the clinic from a failing endeavor to a growing clinic that is consistently in the black. 

Abstract:

Nurse-managed clinics are a unique way to approach healthcare that uses skilled providers to provide services in areas that frequently lack healthcare providers. A failing university sponsored nurse managed clinic was completely restructured to better meet the needs of the population served in the Metro-East St. Louis area and to become fiscally sound. A two-pronged approach of in-house primary care and community outreach was taken utilizing advanced practice nurses. Challenges occurred with having the number of advanced practice nurses needed; insurance credentialing of all providers; insurance reimbursement of advance practice nurses as primary care providers; setting up electronic fund transfers for payments; obtaining an electronic health record system; changing the perspective of not only the public but of the university administration about nurse managed clinics; and most recently initiating an interprofessional approach to healthcare that incorporates social work, pharmacy, and dental. As a result of the efforts put into the changes by the clinic providers over the course of three years, the clinic has gone from being consistently in the red to consistently in the black. Programs, such as an asthma specialty clinic, continue to be added and the number of patients continues to grow.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Michelle Sherlin has diverse experience in the use of patient simulation. Currently she works as the Simulation Specialist for the Division of Nursing at Holyoke Community College. She is responsible for center operations, scenario development, data collection and facilitates all simulations occurring in the center. Recently she published an article in the journal Teaching and Learning in Nursing titled “End- of- life patient simulation lessons learned” which describes a different multi-station simulation being successfully implemented in the school of nursing.  She has extensive experience in moulage techniques and works diligently, creatively and effectively to bring realism to the simulation environment.

Abstract:

With increased nursing school enrollments, the anticipated number of retiring nurses working in perinatal nursing and subsequent need to hire newly graduated nurses, it is imperative that student nurses have perinatal educational experiences beyond the classroom. Our Associate Degree (ADN) nursing program at an urban community college was additionally challenged with limited clinical site placements in labor and delivery because of the number of nursing programs in our geographic area and local BSN programs being priotitized for clinical placements. This was the impetus for the implimentation of a four station perinatal simulation experience for all first year ADN students in our program. Utilizing the Gaumard Noelle birthing simulator, Laerdal Vital sims and Gaumard Newborn Hal simulators, each phase of perinatal care is represented. Students spend 30 minutes caring for patients in each of the stages; latent labor, active labor, transition and delivery to 2 hours post partum. They provide guided care for both the mother and baby in each. Staff from a local hospital provided support to students as well as nursing faculty at each station. Perinatal monitoring software enables students to analyze fetal rhythms.  Student feedback has been exceptionally positive and students have successfully achieved learning outcomes over the course of the four years that this simulation has been in place. Students report that this experiential learning opportunity enhances thier understanding and self confidence. Staff at the clinical sites also report that students are better prepared and knoweledgeable about nursing actions in each phase.

Biography:

 

Michelle Sherlin has diverse experience in the use of patient simulation. Currently she works as the Simulation Specialist for the Division of Nursing at Holyoke Community College. She is responsible for center operations, scenario development, data collection and facilitates all simulations occurring in the center. Recently she published an article in the journal Teaching and Learning in Nursing titled “End- of- life patient simulation lessons learned” which describes a different multi-station simulation being successfully implemented in the school of nursing.  She has extensive experience in moulage techniques and works diligently, creatively and effectively to bring realism to the simulation environment.

Abstract:

 

With increased nursing school enrollments, the anticipated number of retiring nurses working in perinatal nursing and subsequent need to hire newly graduated nurses, it is imperative that student nurses have perinatal educational experiences beyond the classroom. Our Associate Degree (ADN) nursing program at an urban community college was additionally challenged with limited clinical site placements in labor and delivery because of the number of nursing programs in our geographic area and local BSN programs being priotitized for clinical placements. This was the impetus for the implimentation of a four station perinatal simulation experience for all first year ADN students in our program. Utilizing the Gaumard Noelle birthing simulator, Laerdal Vital sims and Gaumard Newborn Hal simulators, each phase of perinatal care is represented. Students spend 30 minutes caring for patients in each of the stages; latent labor, active labor, transition and delivery to 2 hours post partum. They provide guided care for both the mother and baby in each. Staff from a local hospital provided support to students as well as nursing faculty at each station. Perinatal monitoring software enables students to analyze fetal rhythms.  Student feedback has been exceptionally positive and students have successfully achieved learning outcomes over the course of the four years that this simulation has been in place. Students report that this experiential learning opportunity enhances thier understanding and self confidence. Staff at the clinical sites also report that students are better prepared and knoweledgeable about nursing actions in each phase.

Speaker
Biography:

Olubunmi I. Daramola completed her PhD in Nursing and Masters of Public Health degree from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is an Assistant Professor at the Wayne State University College of Nursing and board certified Adult /Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner with expertise in health promotion risk reduction.

Abstract:

This literature review supports development of a theoretical construct that the processes of migration and acculturation in relation to perceptions of hypertension, dietary habits and life style behavior affect the health trajectory of immigrants to the United States and other western nations, specifically African immigrant women. Explanatory models such as the cognitive representation of illness (CR) and Leventhal’s Self-Regulation Model (SRM) are reviewed in relation to perceptions of illness and dietary approaches to health in this population. The purpose is to facilitate understanding and development of culturally relevant preventive program for immigrants.

 

The discussion will cover traditional African illness representations, which are based on beliefs that include natural and unnatural causes. It is expected these beliefs will influence the CR of hypertension, as well as dietary behavior (DASH Diet) associated with control of hypertension, among African immigrant women. The literature suggests that the process of acculturation exposes African immigrants to new knowledge that will modify their illness representation. A question to ask is if the CR modification is enough to influence coping patterns, adaptive outcomes and subsequent illness management. Programming and formal education are likely needed to modify the SRM in the case of special populations such as African immigrant women.

Speaker
Biography:

Esther Ampadu has worked as a nursing faculty member for more than 30 years.  Esther started her nursing education in Liberia where she earned her BSN degree and a midwifery certificate. She continued her education at Northeastern University where she earned a master’s degree in nursing in the early 90s. She also completed her PhD in Nursing from Northeastern University a couple of years ago.

Esther taught at Cuttington University for eight years and has been teaching at Laboure for the past 25 years. Her research interests include issues related to nursing faculty. Her main interests as a nursing faculty member is teaching and mentoring students so they achieve success as nurses and future nursing faculty

Abstract:

To maintain sufficient nursing faculty to meet the challenges posed by the 2010 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, schools of nursing must determine how to decrease faculty job stress, promote job satisfaction, and improve faculty retention. This dissertation’s primary aim is to examine the relationships between job stress, job satisfaction, and intent to remain in academia among nursing faculty with research focused doctoral degree (RFDD), who teach at baccalaureate level or higher. Its secondary aim is to identify predictors of these same phenomena. A tertiary aim is to test the applicability of the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model to effectively explain the nature of the relationships between job stress, job satisfaction, and intent to remain in academia among RFDD prepared nursing faculty who participated in this study. Responses from 363 nursing faculty members who met the inclusion criteria for this study were analyzed. The questionnaire used included the following components: Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) which measured job stress, Job In General (JIG) which measured job satisfaction, Job Descriptive Index (JDI) which measured faculty satisfaction with coworkers, present job, pay, promotion and supervision, and a single question on intent to remain in academia (IRA). Forty-seven percent of faculty reported job stress, 92% (n =326) reported job satisfaction, and 81% (n=275) reported intent to remain in academia. Statistical analysis indicated that demographic factors, such as age, gender, and years as faculty, did not influence job stress, but level of formal education and number of hours worked on the job were influential factors of job stress. A logistic regression showed that job satisfaction was a significant predictor of intent to remain in academia. Job satisfaction also mediated the relationship between intent to remain in academia and job stress. This study indicates that although nursing faculty did report job stress, they also reported job satisfaction and intent to remain in academia.

Deepti B. Prajapati

New York University Langone Medical Center, USA

Title: Considerations for creating a protocol for Vedolizumab infusions
Biography:

Deepti B. Prajapati has completed her BSN at Western Connecticut State University, and her MSN at Southern Connecticut State University.  She is board certified as a Family Nurse Practitioner, and is currently practicing at NYU Langone Medical Center’s Infusion Center at the Center for Musculoskeletal Care (CMC). 

Abstract:

Vedolizumab (Entyvio) is one of several treatment options for the management of Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease. It is a recombinant humanized anti-alpha-4-beta-7 integrin monoclonal antibody. Integrins are proteins involved in regulating cellular movement, including the migration of leukocytes to the gut.  It is specific to the intestinal tract because it binds to the alpha-4-beta-7 integrin, thereby blocking the interaction of the alpha-4-beta-7 integrin with mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1.  This results in the inhibition of memory T-lymphocytes migrating across the endothelium into inflamed gastrointestinal tissue.  This biologic immunotherapy is utilized in patients who have failed or achieved inadequate response to the different therapies currently available for these disease processes. Certain considerations include monitoring/screening for tuberculosis (TB), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), and liver injury. These are rare adverse effects and occurrences. A protocol for the safe administration of Vedolizumab at NYU's CMC Infusion Center is based on current prescribing guidelines.